DC Motors Explained: Brushed vs Brushless

 

Electric motors are the backbone of modern automation. Motors convert electrical energy into mechanical energy, and the resulting motion and torque drive a load.

A simple DC motor has a stationary set of magnets in the stator and an armature with one or more windings of insulated wire wrapped around a soft iron core that concentrates the magnetic field. The windings usually have multiple turns around the core, and in large motors, there can be several parallel current paths. The ends of the wire winding are connected to a commutator. The commutator allows each armature coil to be energized in turn and connects the rotating coils with the external power supply through brushes. The total amount of current sent to the coil, the coil’s size and what it’s wrapped around dictate the strength of the electromagnetic field created. The sequence of turning a coil on or off dictates what direction the effective electromagnetic fields are pointed. By turning on and off coils in sequence a rotating magnetic field can be created. These rotating magnetic fields interact with the magnetic fields of the magnets (permanent or electromagnets) in the stationary part of the motor, the stator to create a torque on the armature which causes it to rotate. In some DC motor designs, the stator fields use electromagnets to create their magnetic fields which allow greater control over the motor.

The brushed DC electric motor generates torque directly from DC power supplied to the motor by using internal commutation, stationary magnets, and rotating electromagnets. Brushes are usually made of graphite or carbon, sometimes with added dispersed copper to improve conductivity. A brush holder has a spring to maintain pressure on the brush as it shortens. For brushes intended to carry more than an ampere or two, a flying lead will be molded into the brush and connected to the motor terminals.

Advantages of a brushed DC motor include low initial cost, high reliability, and simple control of motor speed. Disadvantages are high maintenance and low lifespan for high intensity uses. Maintenance involves regularly replacing the carbon brushes and springs which carry the electric current, as well as cleaning or replacing the commutator. These components are necessary for transferring electrical power from outside the motor to the spinning wire windings of the rotor inside the motor.

Typical brushless DC motors use one or more permanent magnets in the rotor and electromagnets on the motor housing for the stator. A motor controller converts DC to AC. This design is mechanically simpler than that of brushed motors because it eliminates the complication of transferring power from outside the motor to the spinning rotor. The motor controller can sense the rotor’s position via Hall effect sensors or similar devices and can precisely control the timing, phase, etc., of the current in the rotor coils to optimize torque, conserve power, regulate speed, and even apply some braking.

Advantages of brushless motors include long lifespan, little or no maintenance, and high efficiency. Disadvantages include high initial cost and more complicated motor speed controllers. Some such brushless motors are sometimes referred to as “synchronous motors” although they have no external power supply to be synchronized with, as would be the case with normal AC synchronous motors.

 

For more information about Galco’s extensive catalog of DC motors, contact our experts today!

 

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